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Peterboro, New York
NAHOF-National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum
Historic Peterboro, New York

National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum

Gerrit Smith and the Crusade for Social Reform
presented by Norman K. Dann PhD and Peterboro Hertiage Volunteers

Gerrit Smith Flores          051:00pm Saturday, March 11, 2017
Smithfield Community Center 
5255 Pleasant Valley Road
Peterboro, NY 13134

Info: (315) 280- 8828

 

Crusade for Social Reform in Peterboro NY

Peterboro NY will launch its 2017 Crusade for Social Reform at 1 pm on Saturday, March 11, with the annual celebration of Gerrit Smith’s birthday. Born March 6, 1797, Gerrit Smith, who lived and worked his entire adult life in Peterboro NY, was known for his philanthropy and activism for equality. Norman K. Dann PhD, researcher and author of Practical Dreamer: Gerrit Smith and the Crusade for Social Reform will introduce the 19th C. Smith family activities, and then volunteers from the Gerrit Smith Estate National Historic Landmark and the National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum will explain the 2017 programs that will continue the quest for human rights in the 21st C.

The 25th Annual Peterboro Civil War Weekend June 10 and 11 will feature the relationship of John Brown and Gerrit Smith who were determined to abolish slavery. This weekend event began in 1992 with the vision and leadership of Beth Spokowsky to explain how the relationship between Gerrit Smith and John Brown helped ignite the Civil War. Dr. Dann will describe the events leading up to Harpers Ferry in 1859. The catalyst that brought Smith to Brown’s attention was Smith’s endeavor to assure voting rights to black males by providing 40 acres of land to 3,000 African-Americans. This project in the Adirondacks came to be known as Timbuctoo, and after years of research the John Brown Lives organization has created a travelling exhibit Dreaming of Timbuctoo which will open in Peterboro for Civil War Weekend.  On Saturday afternoon, August 6 during Emancipation Days, Timbuctoo creators will provide programs on the exhibit and voting rights. During Emancipation Days, attendees commemorate the emancipation activities of generations before, and provide Community Conversations to examine the quest for human rights.

In commemoration of the New York State Centennial of Women’s Suffrage, Civil War Weekend will also include a series of programs on Women in the Civil War – from fashion to equal rights. September 23rd Elizabeth Smith Miller will be featured with programs, Morning Marmalade, and a Bloomer Tea to relate her contributions to the domestic sphere of women, to dress reform with her bloomers, and to political equality with her club. Afternoon programs and the evening Suffrage Supper will focus on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and her reform upbringing in Peterboro, as well as her relationship with her reform cousin Gerrit Smith. On Sunday, September 24th Suzanne Spring PhD will explain how the abolition movement launched the Women’s right movement. Area libraries will launch the Community Read of Invention of Wings. The Read will culminate on Sunday, October 22 with a program on Angelina and Sarah Grimké during the National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum (NAHOF) Commemoration Weekend. A panel will examine current extensions of these crusades for women.  In closing Sally Roesch Wagner PhD will challenge the audience to continue the suffrage movement.

On Saturday October 21 NAHOF will commemorate its 2016 inductees to the Hall of Fame. Programs on Rev. John Gregg Fee, Beriah Green, Angelina Grimké, and James W.C. Pennington will be presented during the Abolition Symposium. A concert by the Berea College choir will honor Rev. Fee, a special tour of Beriah Green’s Utica will be conducted by the Oneida County Freedom Trail, a School of Divinity will honor Rev. Pennington, and The Invention of Wings Community Read culmination will feature the connections of inductee Angelina Grimké to Peterboro.

The public is encouraged to participate in all activities. The Gerrit Smith Estate National Historic Landmark and the National Abolition Hall of Fame will be open for events, weekend afternoons, by special appointment for group tours, and week days to be determined. Check www.PeterboroNY.org for updates and developments, or contact 315-280-8828.

 

 

Gerrit Smith Flores          05Gerrit Smith, the wealthiest land owner in New York State, believed his wealth a divine gift to give away to those less fortunate. He funded many 19thCentury social reforms including abolition, land rights, voting rights, and women’s rights. 
 

John Brown was introduced to Gerrit Smith through Smith’s land grants to 3000 black men. Smith and five others from Boston supported Brown’s efforts to destabilize slavery. These supporters became known as the Secret Six..

 

Lock & Luce SF 2015 Tisha Lock and Jody Luce of Peterboro promote Votes for Women in Seneca Falls.

 

 

 

Angelina Grimké was inducted into the National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum October 22, 2016 and will be commemorated at the Hall October 21 and 22, 2017 with relatives, authors, and a community read of Invention of Wings.

 

 

The Dreaming of Timbuctoo exhibit created by John Brown Lives project in Lake Placid explains the 120,000 acres of lands donated by Gerrit Smith to disenfranchised free black men. The exhibit will be in Peterboro June and July 2017.

Watch Night for the Emancipation Proclamation

Once again, in honor of President Lincoln’s January 1, 1863 Emancipation Proclamation, and Gerrit Smith’s connection to the copy of the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation in the New York State Library, Owen Corpin will provide a program and prepare the watch fire for the Watch Night commemoration at 4 p.m. Sunday, December 31, 2016. Corpin organized the first Peterboro Watch Night for the Sesquicentennial of the Emancipation Proclamation. The program will begin at the Smithfield Community Center, 5255 Pleasant Valley Road, Peterboro NY 13134 and will move to the watch fire site on the Peterboro Green. Retired Navy Commander Owen Corpin, a descendant of 19th Century freedom seekers who came to Peterboro, will describe the long wait through the night of December 31, 1862. 

The public is encouraged to join in this free observance of the 1862 Watch Night. Dress warmly! Bring a flashlight! The Deli on the Green will be open until 7 p.m.

For more information: Owen Corpin at 315-750-6561 or nahofm1835@gmail.comhttp://www.gerritsmith.org/calendar/2016-peterboro-heritage-calendar

 

President Johnson Signs Civil Rights Act 1965    RESISTING the NEW JIM CROW

2 p.m. Saturday, July 9, 2016

National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum
5255 Pleasant Valley Road    PO Box 55
Peterboro NY 13134



At 2 p.m. Saturday, July 9 the National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum (NAHOF) will host the culminating event for its CHANGING AMERICA exhibit and programs: a Community Conversation on the subject of "Resisting the New Jim Crow."  NAHOF invites the public to join in sharing thoughts about the ways to engage in the work of racial justice at this time. This conversation will aim to help each be active, in many small ways, in standing together to work toward an end to such things as the school-to-prison pipeline, police brutality, and the legacy of white supremacy that still perpetuates racism and de-values black lives.  Following the Civil War, despite the enactment of the13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments, state and local governments enforced laws that included racial segregation in restrooms, restaurants, schools, housing, and transportation. These unjust regulations were called Jim Crow laws. (“Jim Crow” had become a pejorative word for African-Americans in the early 1800s.) Most of these laws were overturned by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The “New Jim Crow” practices are renewed attempts at discrimination and repression since the Civil Rights laws. Given continued American racism and NAHOF’s mission tohonor antislavery abolitionists, their work to end slavery, and the legacy of that struggle, and strive to complete the second and ongoing abolition – the moral conviction to end racism, the session will identify actions that Central New Yorkers can begin the next day and ways in which participants can ‘March on Central New York’ as 21st century abolitionists. 

 

Drea Finley will be the lead facilitator of the community conversation. Finley is a member of the Cabinet of Freedom for the National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum and is co-chair of its Cultural Diversity Committee. In her working life, Finley serves as an Assistant Dean for Administrative Advising and Director of First Generation Programs at Colgate University. Finley is also a Masters student at Syracuse University in the Higher Education Cultural Foundations Program. As an activist; she writes and speaks often on race and racism and their intersections with other identities and systems of oppression. 

 

Deirdre Sinnott, writer and activist, will also be facilitating. She has presented on the Utica's role in the history of the abolition movement at: Harriet Tubman 2016 Underground Railroad Conference, Cambridge, MD; Oneida County Historical Society, Utica, NY; Bluestockings Bookstore, Manhattan; Adams Antiquarian Book Shop, Hobart, NY; Otisville Correctional Facility's Black History Month Celebration, Otisville, NY. She conceived and organized the 2015 Commemoration of Utica's Abolition History Day at Hope Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church in home of Utica's oldest African-American congregation, on the 180th anniversary of the Utica Riot against the founding of the New York Anti-Slavery Society. Sinnott is presently writing a novel set in Utica in 1835. 

 

Other members of the Cabinet of Freedom (NAHOF governing board) who will join in the discussion include: Norman K. Dann PhD, researcher and author of Gerrit Smith, and Tim McLaughlin PhD, Vice-President and Project Director for the Changing America exhibit and programs. Jordan Henderson, 2016 Colgate University Upstate Fellow at NAHOF, will also be part of the NAHOF presenters.

 

Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863, and the March on Washington, 1963, a national traveling exhibition which explores the relationship between two great people’s movements for equal rights, opened at the National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum (NAHOF)  at 5255 Pleasant Valley Road, Peterboro NY 13134 on Saturday, June 4, 2016. NAHOF is one of fifty sites in the country awarded this special exhibit. Changing America examines the events leading up to the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, and the March on Washington in 1963. Both events grew out of decades of bold actions, resistance, organization, and vision. One hundred years separate them, yet they are linked in the larger story of a struggle for liberty which brought together different races, classes and ideologies and had a profound impact on the generations that followed.

 

The Changing America traveling exhibition is presented by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Museum of American History in collaboration with the American Library Association Public Programs Office. The development and tour of Changing America are made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH): Exploring the human endeavor. The public is encouraged to attend the Changing America exhibit and program at 5255 Pleasant Valley Road, Peterboro NY 13134. Admission is free. For more information: 315-280-8828nahofm1835@gmail.com,www.nationalabolitionhalloffameandmuseum.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 June 4 ~ July 14, 2016

 

Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863, and the March on Washington, 1963, a national traveling exhibition which explores the relationship between two great people’s movements for equal rights, opens at the National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum (NAHOF)  at 5255 Pleasant Valley Road, Peterboro NY 13134 on Saturday, June 4, 2016. NAHOF is one of fifty sites in the country awarded this special exhibit.

Changing Americaexamines the events leading up to the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, and the March on Washington in 1963. Both grew out of decades of bold actions, resistance, organization, and vision. One hundred years separate them, yet they are linked in the larger story of a struggle for liberty which brought together different races, classes and ideologies and had a profound impact on the generations that followed.

Changing Americais presented by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Museum of American History in collaboration with the American Library Association Public Programs Office. The traveling exhibition is made possible by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor. NAHOF and partner libraries are offering free programs in connection with the exhibition:

Thursday, April 28 at 7 pm the Oneida Public Library, in preparation for the Changing America exhibit,will show a PBS movie The March on Washington after which Max Smith, Co-Chair of the Annual Peterboro Emancipation Day, will lead a discussion on the movie.

Wednesday, May 25 at 7 pm the Cazenovia Public Library will show the movie Brother Outside: The Life of Bayard Rustin. Rustin was the primary organizer of the March on Washington in 1963.

Saturday, June 4 the Changing America exhibit will open at NAHOF with a series of programs for the public.

§  4:30 pm   The Changing America Exhibit: An Introduction and Explanation by exhibit project director Tim McLaughlin PhD.

§  5:30 pm   A Changing America exhibit reception with refreshments for the public - with recognitions to members of the Stone Quarry Hill Art Park for the loan of the sculpture The Young Lincoln, and to the persons involved in the 2015 Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle programs in Madison County. (Created Equal was made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.)

§  7:00 pm   Emancipation Music: Lyrics and Songs presented and performed by Max Smith. A selection of songs from 1863 and 1963 will be explained as to historical origins, uses, performers, and sung by Smith. An “Emancipation Hymnal” program will be given to the audience members.

Monday, June 6 at 7 pm at the Hamilton Public Library a book discussion on The Help will be led by library staff.

Saturday, June 18 at 2 pm at NAHOF Remembering the March on Washington with personal accounts, pictures, and newspaper reports will be hosted by Tim McLaughlin PhD during New York State’s Path through History Weekend.

Saturday, June 25 at 2 pm at NAHOF Spaces of Enslavement: Spaces of Freedom will be presented by Ary J. Lamme III PhD, followed by a tour with Norman K. Dann PhD of the Gerrit Smith Estate National Historic Landmark freedom spaces.

Sunday, July 3 at 2 pm at NAHOF Christine Ridarsky, City of Rochester historian, will show a video of the discovery of a new Frederick Douglass portrait found in a scrapbook, and speak to Douglass’ speech What to the Slave in the Fourth of July? 

Saturday July 9 at 2 pm at NAHOF the NAHOF Cultural Diversity Committee will examine how NAHOF’s mission “to complete the second and ongoing abolition” relates to Resisting the “New Jim Crow.”

The Changing America exhibit opens June 4 and closes July 14 with weekend hours 1- 5 pm and Mondays – Thursday from 12 – 4 pm. The public is encouraged to take advantage of the opportunity to visit the exhibit and to attend the programs, and to check for updates and further information at www.nationalabolitionhalloffameandmuseum.org, nahofm1835@gmail.com, and 315-280-8828.

            

Contact:  Dorothy  Willsey  dwillsey@twcny.rr.com     315-684-3262